Detailed requirements

TYPES OF ARTICLES

  1. Original scientific article – describes the results of not yet published research and scientific experiments carried out by the author, or a team of scientists directly subordinated to him/her. The results are new in relation to the foregoing knowledge and achievements in the particular field, and constitute original contribution to the world’s science. Such publications are usually scientific primary sources.
  2. Short scientific report (initial report; survey report) – describes initial but at this stage promising results of conducted, but still unfinished research.
  3. Review article – describes the current state of knowledge in the particular thematic field, sometimes providing controversial issues and contentions; involves both theoretical (current and properly chosen literature) and practical description of the topic; the author should include into the article unresolved problems related to the issue.
  4. Case study – analysis of actual events – an article of this type includes: description of the untypical event / case (one or more), difficult from the scientific and practical point of view; the analysis of this event, discussion based on the up-to-date literature and conclusions derived from the conducted analysis.

STRUCTURED ABSTRACTS

An article submitted for publication shall have a structured abstract written in two languages in accordance with one of the following examples. Articles without structured abstracts and with less than 2400 symbols including spaces will not be qualified for the reviewing process.

  1. Abstract structure of an original scientific article / short scientific report
    • Purpose - should clearly state the hypothesis which is formulated in the article;
    • Project and methods - tools and methods used in the research;
    • Results - the outcome of the study;
    • Conclusions - the outcome in relation to the hypothesis and possible directions for future research.
  2. Abstract structure of a review article / case study – analysis of actual events
    • Purpose - main questions made in the article;
    • Introduction - context / background of the issue/problem introduced in the article;
    • Methodology - methods or tools used in the analysis;
    • Conclusions - main conclusions derived from a review article / analysis of actual events.

If the article does not fit none of the aforementioned structures, a most adequate structure shall be applied. Authors are obliged to inform the editorial office about the type of article they are sending (an original scientific article, a review article, a scientific report, a case study – analysis of actual events or best practice in action article).

ARTICLE’S STRUCTURE

File with an article should not involve data that could suggest the authors of the paper.

Information about the authors, keywords, abstracts as well as biographical notes should be entered only in the Editorial System Interface.

Since 2020 English is the main publishing language. Articles written by Polish authors will be published in two language versions. Therefore, authors from Poland are asked to submit Polish papers along with English translation. English-speaking authors are requested to provide the title, abstract, text and keywords only in English language.

  1. Structure of an original scientific article/short scientific report:
    • Title - in English (Times New Roman 16 pts., upper-case CAPITALS) and in Polish (Times New Roman 14 pts., lower-case).
    • Structured Abstract - four paragraphs with headings in boldface type, about 2500 symbols – including spaces in English (but not less than 2400) and about 2500 symbols – including spaces in Polish (but not less than 2400); Times New Roman 10 pts.
    • Keywords - in English and in Polish, a total of 10 phrases; Times New Roman 10 pts.
    • Introduction
    • Methods
    • Results
    • Discussion about methods and results
    • Summing-up/Conclusions
    • Literature
    English-speaking authors are requested to provide the title, abstract and keywords only in English language.
  2. Structure of a review article/case study – analysis of actual events:
    • Title - in Polish (Times New Roman 16 pts., upper-case CAPITALS) and in English (Times New Roman 14 pts., lower-case).
    • Structured Abstract - four paragraphs with headings in boldface type, about 2500 symbols – including spaces in English (but not less than 2400) and about 2500 symbols – including spaces in Polish (but not less than 2400); Times New Roman 10 pts.
    • Keywords - in English and Polish, a total of 10 phrases; Times New Roman 10 pts.
    • Introduction
    • Chapters titled by the author
    • Summing-up
    • Conclusions
    • Literature
    English-speaking authors are requested to provide the title, abstract and keywords only in English language.

LITERATURE

Literature references are identified at the end of the article in a sequence as they appear in the text. Bibliographic commentary should be in a uniform version. Names and titles, written in Cyrillic should appear in the transliteration in accordance with the BGN/PCGN transliteration system. It is recommended that, in the main, referenced material should be publications, which have been reviewed. In the case of precise quotations in the text against the number of an assigned publication located in the literature index, one should also include the page number, of the quotation source e.g. [12, p. 234]. Polish quotations should be inserted within quotation marks. Quotations in other languages should be written in italics.

Examples of bibliographic references in the literature index (based on the Chicago Citation Style):

  • Book references:
    Szczerba K., Safe Home, Publisher CNBOP-PIB, Józefów 2012.
  • Chapter from joint sources:
    Suchorab P., The impact of crude oil based products on the physical and mechanical properties of concrete, w: Removal of oil derived substances from roads and the soil , J. Rakowska (Ed.), Publisher CNBOP-PIB, Józefów 2012, 37-44.
  • Journal article:
    Mizerski A., Foams as carriers of chemicals for neutralizing contamination , BiTP Vol. 29 Issue 1, 2013, pp. 87–93.
  • Article in an online journal:
    Ciekanowski Z., Motivation and system of periodic assessment , BiTP Vol. 29 Issue 1, 2013, pp. 29-33 [electr. doc.]
    http://czytelnia.cnbop.pl/czytelnia/31/348 [accessed: 3.05.2013].
  • Material from conferences:
    Adamiec P., Problems encountered during welding and repair of machinery, w: Machine Technology. Collection of papers: III Professorial Scientific Workshops – TM ’97, II Research Work Forum ’96 – Shaping of machine parts by the removal of substances, T. Karpiński (red.), Publisher Politechnika Koszalińska, Koszalin, 1997, 23–31.
  • Research communications:
    Centre for Research of Public Opinion, Research communication: Actual problems and incidents, [electr. doc.]
    http://badanie.cbos.pl/details.asp?q=a1&id=4809, [accessed: 06.05.2013].
  • Statute, standards and EU Directives:
    1. Statute dated 24 August 1991 concerning The Polish State Fire Service (Dz. U. [Journal of Laws] 2009 No. 12 item 68).
    2. PN-EN 54-4:2001 Fire alarm systems – Part 4: Power supply.
    3. Commission Directive 2009/149/WE dated 27 November 2009 concerning directive 2004/49/WE of the European Parliament dealing with community safety indicators and community methods of calculating costs of incidents.

TABLES, FIGURES AND ILLUSTRATIONS

Captions for tables, figures and illustrations as well as texts in tables, figures and illustrations should be in the language in which the article was written and in English. Tables should be incorporated in the text and, additionally, produced in a separate file and submitted as an enclosure to the article. As a rule, figures should be submitted in a form ready for printing, in separate files (jpg or tiff format – minimum 300 dpi, about 1MB). Diagrams made in Excel (or its analogue) should be sent in .xls format. Articles without graphic elements of appropriate quality will not be printed. Authors shall always indicate sources while presenting tables, figures, diagrams and photographs or inform about own elaboration using caption: “Author’s own elaboration”.

ABBREVIATIONS

At the end to the article the author should draw up the list of abbreviations used in the paper with the information what they stand for.